the faux bohemian

Posts tagged william & mary

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We are always interested in understanding more about the College’s relationship with black people and red people,” said College President Taylor Reveley. “We already know a lot about the College’s relationship with white people. We’ve had black people and red people here since the beginning, so now we are trying to better understand that history, and one way of doing that is through archeological discovery.
This is a really strange way to say what you’re trying to say, T Reve. Was the reporter a 5-year old child?

(Source: flathatnews.com)

Filed under flat hat william & mary taylor revely archeology wren building slavery history quote black people red people white people william and mary

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I kinda miss being at school in December. Before going, I had thought that the lead up to Christmas would be a real bummer when away from home and working on finals up until the 22nd or 23rd when we’d get off (William & Mary had a very late break).
In the end though, it wound up being my favorite time of year to be at school. I remember huddling over books studying for finals in the library for hours listening to Sufjan’s Christmas albums on repeat.  And walking through Colonial Williamsburg in full-on natural wreath, candle-in-window, nippy wind, and woodsmoke glory. And even the self-consciously hoky Yule Log Ceremony, where a log was brought through the assembled crowd in the Wren Building yard to be thrown into the fire and each student cast a sprig of holly into the blaze to represent shedding their worries and cares for the year. All of it made that time of year worthwhile, and helped to make that long month seem shorter before heading home for food, family, and well-deserved time for relaxation.
It’s all a little less significant when I have lots of free time in the evenings, reliable transportation, and no ancient traditions to uphold. Now, all of a sudden, it is about buying things for people. At least until those people show up, or you go to find them, at least. Sometimes it feels that the joy of getting back together with friends and family is the only joy that’s survived the transition to the working world.

I kinda miss being at school in December. Before going, I had thought that the lead up to Christmas would be a real bummer when away from home and working on finals up until the 22nd or 23rd when we’d get off (William & Mary had a very late break).

In the end though, it wound up being my favorite time of year to be at school. I remember huddling over books studying for finals in the library for hours listening to Sufjan’s Christmas albums on repeat.  And walking through Colonial Williamsburg in full-on natural wreath, candle-in-window, nippy wind, and woodsmoke glory. And even the self-consciously hoky Yule Log Ceremony, where a log was brought through the assembled crowd in the Wren Building yard to be thrown into the fire and each student cast a sprig of holly into the blaze to represent shedding their worries and cares for the year. All of it made that time of year worthwhile, and helped to make that long month seem shorter before heading home for food, family, and well-deserved time for relaxation.

It’s all a little less significant when I have lots of free time in the evenings, reliable transportation, and no ancient traditions to uphold. Now, all of a sudden, it is about buying things for people. At least until those people show up, or you go to find them, at least. Sometimes it feels that the joy of getting back together with friends and family is the only joy that’s survived the transition to the working world.

Filed under christmas musing william & mary yule log december holiday

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Churchkey Beer Director Greg Engert has a point here:

One general idea I subscribe to is that beer tends to compliment the  flavors of food, while wine tends to contrast. This is born out by the  processes involved in the creation of either beverage. The malts  employed in brewing have been “cooked,” resulting in flavors one will  find in cooked food: roasted, caramelized, toasted, grilled. And beer is  seasoned with hops, but often also orange peel, coriander, ginger,  chocolate, etc. This allows for beer to echo the flavors found in foods  also cooked and seasoned. I will admit that this sort of commonality  makes beer and food pairing a bit more approachable, but it is different  than what wine can do with food (and not necessarily better).

(Above: I successfully paired Yeungling Lager with some greasy food from the Green Leafe. Doing William & Mary proud.)

Churchkey Beer Director Greg Engert has a point here:

One general idea I subscribe to is that beer tends to compliment the flavors of food, while wine tends to contrast. This is born out by the processes involved in the creation of either beverage. The malts employed in brewing have been “cooked,” resulting in flavors one will find in cooked food: roasted, caramelized, toasted, grilled. And beer is seasoned with hops, but often also orange peel, coriander, ginger, chocolate, etc. This allows for beer to echo the flavors found in foods also cooked and seasoned. I will admit that this sort of commonality makes beer and food pairing a bit more approachable, but it is different than what wine can do with food (and not necessarily better).

(Above: I successfully paired Yeungling Lager with some greasy food from the Green Leafe. Doing William & Mary proud.)

Filed under green leafe william & mary churchkey beer food

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"The Department of Aeronautics at the College of William and Mary was initiated in 1931 by President Julian A.C. Chandler in connection with James Riordan School of New York City which was operating out of a steamship berthed at Jamestown. It was the first of its kind at any American institution.
Lieutenant Colonel Earl C. Popp, who taught at the Riordan School, offered his services as a flight instructor to William and Mary students for free in exchange for the use of laboratory facilities at the college for his students. In addition to Popp, Julian Chandler, President Chandler’s son, and Yelverton O. Kent served as assistant instructors. Students learned to fly in four different planes, including an open-cockpit Biplane, a Fleet Trainer, a Kitty Hawk and a Curtis Robin. Survivors of the era recall that the planes were painted green, gold and silver. Students were required to take part in courses three times a week and additional laboratory work at the College Airport.
Once students logged 20 hours of flight time, they were eligible to become private pilots. After three years, the college deemed the cost of insurance and maintenance on the planes too much, and the program was shut down. By the end, approximately forty-four students completed training, including one woman, Minnie Cole Savage.
The students of the Aeronautics Department formed the Flight Club in 1931, and won the Loening Cup in 1933.”
Via Swem Special Collections

"The Department of Aeronautics at the College of William and Mary was initiated in 1931 by President Julian A.C. Chandler in connection with James Riordan School of New York City which was operating out of a steamship berthed at Jamestown. It was the first of its kind at any American institution.

Lieutenant Colonel Earl C. Popp, who taught at the Riordan School, offered his services as a flight instructor to William and Mary students for free in exchange for the use of laboratory facilities at the college for his students. In addition to Popp, Julian Chandler, President Chandler’s son, and Yelverton O. Kent served as assistant instructors. Students learned to fly in four different planes, including an open-cockpit Biplane, a Fleet Trainer, a Kitty Hawk and a Curtis Robin. Survivors of the era recall that the planes were painted green, gold and silver. Students were required to take part in courses three times a week and additional laboratory work at the College Airport.

Once students logged 20 hours of flight time, they were eligible to become private pilots. After three years, the college deemed the cost of insurance and maintenance on the planes too much, and the program was shut down. By the end, approximately forty-four students completed training, including one woman, Minnie Cole Savage.

The students of the Aeronautics Department formed the Flight Club in 1931, and won the Loening Cup in 1933.”

Via Swem Special Collections

Filed under history william & mary flight airport williamsburg

Notes

this is why WM doesn’t have a mascot

A mixed history:
1896

The W&M football team was nicknamed “The Orange and White” after the team colors.

1909

The uniform colors changed to the “Orange and Black,” because the white became dirty too quickly, according to one report. The team was consequently called “The Orange and Black.”

1916

The nickname “Indians” was first referenced in the 1916 edition of the Colonial Echo referring to the basketball team. The teams adopted the nickname and a logo of an Indian with a knife and tomahawk.

1923

The College earned the nickname “Fighting Virginians” from the “Northern Press” as a result of the team’s effort in a 24-7 loss to the Syracuse Orangemen.

1924

The College’s colors were changed to green, gold and silver. The colors came from the College’s coat of arms. The change was officially made so that the College and athletic colors would be identical.

1924

The term “Tribe” was first referenced in the 1924 edition of the Colonial Echo. Other nicknames that were given to the College’s teams during this time period and the years following it include Big Green, Braves and Warriors.

1927

A 17-foot alligator named “Cal” served as W&M’s mascot.

Late 1930s to 1942

An Indian pony WAMPO was used on the sidelines as a mascot. The pony often carried a rider in full Indian attire. WAMPO’s name was derived from “William And Mary POny.”

1947

One sports write dubbed the W&M football team “The Big Green Indians” during its first post-season bowl bid.

1953

The team became known as the “Iron Indians,” after the name appeared in a Richmond Times-Dispatch article.

Mid-to-late-1960s to mid-1970s

A caricature similar to that used by the Cleveland Indians was used as a logo.

1974

A “WM” with feathers logo first appeared in a 1974 Football Yearbook and then on the helmets of the 1977 football team.

1978

The Indian images were removed from the athletic logo. The term “Indian” was phased out by the early 1980s. The “WM’ with two feathers became the College’s official new logo, and the term “Tribe” continued to be used.

Filed under william & mary mascot athletics college history

Notes

Them’s fightin’ words, TJ!

"We have in that state a college (Wm. & Mary) just well enough endowed to draw out the miserable existence to which a miserable constitution has doomed it. It is moreover eccentric in it’s position, exposed to bilious diseases as all the lower country is, & therefore abandoned by the public care, as that part of the country itself is in a considerable degree by it’s inhabitants. We wish to establish in the upper & healthier country, & more centrally for the state, an University on a plan so broad & liberal & modern, as to be worth patronizing with the public support, and be a temptation to the youth of other states to come and drink of the cup of knowledge & fraternize with us.”

- Thomas Jefferson, in a letter to Joseph Priestly, January 1800

Filed under jefferson william & mary university of virginia education virginia