the faux bohemian

1 note

udhcmh:

The new college student, leaving home and after three months.
From Sidney Wells’ Life At Ohio State (1923).
Wells (Class of 1922) was a popular cartoonist on campus and illustrated football programs and the campus humor magazine The Sundial.
The more things change…

udhcmh:

The new college student, leaving home and after three months.

From Sidney Wells’ Life At Ohio State (1923).

Wells (Class of 1922) was a popular cartoonist on campus and illustrated football programs and the campus humor magazine The Sundial.

The more things change…

355 notes

thegetty:

ryanlintelman:

thegetty:

On this day in history, a British colonial magistrate in India began using fingerprints as identifiers. It is considered the first official use of nature’s signature.
Can you find the painter’s accidental fingerprint on this Classical Athenian mug fragment? Click through for a close up!

Are you kidding me, Getty? This post is about the fingerprint on this mug? How about WHAT THE F**K IS THIS GUY DOING?

Good point. We asked our antiquities expert and here’s what he said!

Haha thank you, Getty New Media folks, for taking my mock anger seriously! I appreciate any explanation involving “a kind of ritualistic wine-fueled Conga line”.

thegetty:

ryanlintelman:

thegetty:

On this day in history, a British colonial magistrate in India began using fingerprints as identifiers. It is considered the first official use of nature’s signature.

Can you find the painter’s accidental fingerprint on this Classical Athenian mug fragment? Click through for a close up!

Are you kidding me, Getty? This post is about the fingerprint on this mug? How about WHAT THE F**K IS THIS GUY DOING?

Good point. We asked our antiquities expert and here’s what he said!

Haha thank you, Getty New Media folks, for taking my mock anger seriously! I appreciate any explanation involving “a kind of ritualistic wine-fueled Conga line”.

Filed under getty ancient greece tumblr new media museums conga line

19 notes

ladydilettanti:

alpha-lima-lima-papa:

do we really all have to be here for thisoh good question i don’t know what’s the only checkers rule that we have in this house dad pleaseWHAT’S THE ONLY CHECKERS RULE THAT WE HAVE IN THIS HOUSE the checkers rule is that we all have t–THE ONLY CHECKERS RULE IS THAT WHEN I WANT TO PLAY CHECKERS EVERYBODY PLAYS CHECKERS
Women Who Are Not Having a Great Time in Western Art History



honestly there is likenot a great way to say thisbut i sort of figured that more of you were going to die in childhoodor likein childbirth or somethinglike you would die while i was in childbirthnothing personal i just didnt think there were still going to be so many of you here at this point in my life

ladydilettanti:

alpha-lima-lima-papa:

do we really all have to be here for this
oh good question
i don’t know
what’s the only checkers rule that we have in this house
dad
please
WHAT’S THE ONLY CHECKERS RULE THAT WE HAVE IN THIS HOUSE
the checkers rule is that we all have t–
THE ONLY CHECKERS RULE IS THAT WHEN I WANT TO PLAY CHECKERS EVERYBODY PLAYS CHECKERS

Women Who Are Not Having a Great Time in Western Art History

honestly there is like
not a great way to say this
but i sort of figured that more of you were going to die in childhood
or like
in childbirth or something
like you would die while i was in childbirth
nothing personal i just didnt think there were still going to be so many of you here at this point in my life

165 notes

explore-blog:


I’d been fascinated with Rand since I’d written a story in the New York Times magazine about a competitive championship tournament bridge player who was also an active objectivist and Rand devotee. I had read half of Atlas Shrugged before I got the gist of my role. I really enjoyed the book because of its absurdly reductive philosophy that inadvertently plays on adolescent male narcissism like a jazz saxophone — to draw a connection to the famous Randian saxophonist and economist Alan Greenspan — but it also spoke directly to the adolescent male fantasy of “I’m the only smart one. Everyone is leeching off of me and I’d rather destroy my work than compromise my integrity by being nice to others.” Her moral severity came as a tonic to my cultural relativist upbringing.

The dress in which John Hodgman impersonated Ayn Rand, one of the many magnificent garment-related tales in Emily Spivack’s Worn Stories.

explore-blog:

I’d been fascinated with Rand since I’d written a story in the New York Times magazine about a competitive championship tournament bridge player who was also an active objectivist and Rand devotee. I had read half of Atlas Shrugged before I got the gist of my role. I really enjoyed the book because of its absurdly reductive philosophy that inadvertently plays on adolescent male narcissism like a jazz saxophone — to draw a connection to the famous Randian saxophonist and economist Alan Greenspan — but it also spoke directly to the adolescent male fantasy of “I’m the only smart one. Everyone is leeching off of me and I’d rather destroy my work than compromise my integrity by being nice to others.” Her moral severity came as a tonic to my cultural relativist upbringing.

The dress in which John Hodgman impersonated Ayn Rand, one of the many magnificent garment-related tales in Emily Spivack’s Worn Stories.

Filed under john hodgman ayn rand alan greenspan