the faux bohemian

2,295 notes

humansofnewyork:

“She’s really encouraged me to find my own style. I didn’t even like patterns before I met her!”

bahahaha these people
I have to laugh because I’m equal parts annoyed and jealous.

humansofnewyork:

“She’s really encouraged me to find my own style. I didn’t even like patterns before I met her!”

bahahaha these people

I have to laugh because I’m equal parts annoyed and jealous.

104 notes

nprfreshair:

For the 50th anniversary of A Hard Day’s Night by The Beatles, John Powers reviews the Criterion DVD release:

"In the unmistakable alchemy of their sound – and in their authentic laughter as they run from shrieking fans during the film’s opening credits – The Beatles embodied the hope and vitality the world was looking for then and still loves to this day. Like Louis Armstrong, they created music that, even when sad, is bursting with joy. All those hard days and nights paid off, for more than any band I can think of, they captured the yeah-yeah-yeah of happiness."

Read the full review: 'A Hard Day's Night': A Pop Artifact That Still Crackles With Energy
Photo via Janus films 

A good paragraph:

A few months before A Hard Day’s Night opened, The Beatles had landed in an America shattered by the Kennedy assassination not even three months earlier, an America yearning for something alive and optimistic. The band was the ideal antidote to such grief, for The Beatles themselves had risen from an even longer, deeper darkness, the shabby funk of a post-war, post-imperial Britain with a calcified establishment, a frustrated working class, and little future to offer the young.

nprfreshair:

For the 50th anniversary of A Hard Day’s Night by The Beatles, John Powers reviews the Criterion DVD release:

"In the unmistakable alchemy of their sound – and in their authentic laughter as they run from shrieking fans during the film’s opening credits – The Beatles embodied the hope and vitality the world was looking for then and still loves to this day. Like Louis Armstrong, they created music that, even when sad, is bursting with joy. All those hard days and nights paid off, for more than any band I can think of, they captured the yeah-yeah-yeah of happiness."

Read the full review: 'A Hard Day's Night': A Pop Artifact That Still Crackles With Energy

Photo via Janus films 

A good paragraph:

A few months before A Hard Day’s Night opened, The Beatles had landed in an America shattered by the Kennedy assassination not even three months earlier, an America yearning for something alive and optimistic. The band was the ideal antidote to such grief, for The Beatles themselves had risen from an even longer, deeper darkness, the shabby funk of a post-war, post-imperial Britain with a calcified establishment, a frustrated working class, and little future to offer the young.

Filed under the beatles a hard day's night film fresh air john powers criterion 1960s

88 notes

pbs-food:

What happens when a handful of Texas homebrewers decide to not only craft their own spirits, but also to make their own copper and fermented gold wash stills, heat exchangers and hot liquor tanks? Chip Tate and the men of Balcones Distillery distill daily with their hammered, patinaed equipment, crafted from the ground up. The result is some of the best whisky around. That glass in your hand? It’s made from honey, figs, corn, camaraderie, and an unwillingness to compromise.

Watch: Balcones Distillery from Dark Rye Magazine

Hnnngggghh

Filed under whiskey rye craft texas balcones distillery spirits drink liquor

1 note

Derek Waters’ worst job.

1. What’s the worst job you’ve ever had?

Derek Waters: Fuck. There’s so many. I guess the best story I have is working at Tower Video. Remember when video tapes existed? I worked at Tower Video when I first moved out to Los Angeles from Baltimore. It was cool, because growing up in the suburbs of Baltimore, I wasn’t really surrounded by independent movies and stuff like that, so I got to learn about lots of new movies. One day this guy came in asking for a movie that I’d never heard of, so I was excited to look it up. We didn’t have it, so I asked what actors were in it, and he named three or four actors, none of them I had ever heard of except for one, which was Sidney Poitier. So I was typing in Sidney Poitier’s name into the computer, but I kept spelling it wrong. So I was like, “How do you spell his last name?” and he spells it for me. Unfortunately we didn’t have the movie, and he said, “Thank you, young man,” and he left. And my boss came up to me and said, “Why the fuck did you just have Sidney Poitier spelling you his own name?” 

Derek Waters, interviewed by the AV Club

Filed under derek waters sidney poitier tower videos interview

4,832 notes

discardingimages:

hey dragon. you’re not supposed to be here.Conception of Alexander the Great, Les faize d’Alexandre (translation of Historiae Alexandri Magni of Quintus Curtius Rufus), Bruges ca. 1468-1475.
British Library, Burney 169, fol. 14r

pwned.

discardingimages:

hey dragon. you’re not supposed to be here.

Conception of Alexander the Great, Les faize d’Alexandre (translation of Historiae Alexandri Magni of Quintus Curtius Rufus), Bruges ca. 1468-1475.

British Library, Burney 169, fol. 14r

pwned.

(via vintagevision)

16 notes

backstoryradio:

Morris Island, SC July 20

My Dear Amelia: I have been in two fights, and am unhurt. I am about to go in another I believe to-night. Our men fought well on both occasions. The last was desperate—we charged that terrible battery on Morris Island known as Fort Wagoner, and were repulsed with a loss of 300 killed and wounded. I escaped unhurt from amidst that perfect hail of shot and shell. It was terrible. I need not particularize the papers will give a better than I have time to give. My thoughts are with you often, you are as dear as ever, be good enough to remember it and I have no doubt you will.

- A letter from Lewis Douglass, eldest son of Frederick Douglass, to his fiancee Amelia Loguen. Douglass served in the 54th Massachusetts Infantry Regiment, the first black regiment raised in the Civil War. Their actions at the Second Battle of Fort Wagner on July 18, 1863 became a concrete rebuttal to racist assumptions that black soldiers would not stand and fight in battle. Lewis was appointed sergeant major of the regiment, the highest rank that black soldiers could achieve at the time, and went on to marry Amelia Loguen.  

Letter via Library of Congress , picture of Lewis Douglass via National Parks Service, picture of Amelia Lougen via Onondaga Historical Society

Filed under civil war USCT 54th Massachusetts american history south carolina fort wagner lewis douglass frederick douglass amelia loguen